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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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Atmos. Meas. Tech., 10, 1723-1737, 2017
http://www.atmos-meas-tech.net/10/1723/2017/
doi:10.5194/amt-10-1723-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
09 May 2017
Autonomous marine hyperspectral radiometers for determining solar irradiances and aerosol optical properties
John Wood et al.
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Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version      Supplement - Supplement
 
RC1: 'Referee comment', Anonymous Referee #1, 23 Feb 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC1: 'Response to reviewer', Timothy Smyth, 04 Apr 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
 
RC2: 'Review of paper: "Autonomous marine hyperspectral radiometers for determining solar irradiances and aerosol optical properties"', Anonymous Referee #3, 28 Feb 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC2: 'Response to reviewer #3', Timothy Smyth, 04 Apr 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Timothy Smyth on behalf of the Authors (04 Apr 2017)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (18 Apr 2017) by M. Campanelli
AR by Timothy Smyth on behalf of the Authors (18 Apr 2017)  Author's response  Manuscript
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
We have developed an instrument which can be deployed on ships in the remote oceans to measure optical properties of the atmosphere. These optical properties are key to understanding how light and heat are transmitted, absorbed and reflected within the atmosphere. This has consequences for how the wider climate system works. The oceans, covering 70 % of the planet, are chronically under-sampled for such optical properties. Such instruments, when widely deployed, should help rectify this problem.
We have developed an instrument which can be deployed on ships in the remote oceans to measure...
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