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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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Atmos. Meas. Tech., 7, 3285-3293, 2014
http://www.atmos-meas-tech.net/7/3285/2014/
doi:10.5194/amt-7-3285-2014
© Author(s) 2014. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
02 Oct 2014
Constraining regional greenhouse gas emissions using geostationary concentration measurements: a theoretical study
P. J. Rayner1, S. R. Utembe1, and S. Crowell2 1School of Earth Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
2College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences, University of Oklahoma, Norman, USA
Abstract. We investigate the ability of column-integrated trace gas measurements from a geostationary satellite to constrain surface fluxes at regional scale. The proposed GEOCARB instrument measures CO2, CO and CH4 at a maximum resolution of 3 km east–west × 2.7 km north–south. Precisions are 3 ppm for CO2, 10 ppb for CO and 18 ppb for CH4. Sampling frequency is flexible. Here we sample a region at the location of Shanghai every 2 daylight hours for 6 days in June. We test the observing system by calculating the posterior uncertainty covariance of fluxes. We are able to constrain urban emissions at 3 km resolution including an isolated power plant. The CO measurement plays the strongest role; without it our effective resolution falls to 5 km. Methane fluxes are similarly well estimated at 5 km resolution. Estimating the errors for a full year suggests such an instrument would be a useful tool for both science and policy applications.

Citation: Rayner, P. J., Utembe, S. R., and Crowell, S.: Constraining regional greenhouse gas emissions using geostationary concentration measurements: a theoretical study, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 7, 3285-3293, doi:10.5194/amt-7-3285-2014, 2014.
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