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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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Atmos. Meas. Tech., 9, 1221-1238, 2016
http://www.atmos-meas-tech.net/9/1221/2016/
doi:10.5194/amt-9-1221-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
23 Mar 2016
Comparison of nitrous oxide (N2O) analyzers for high-precision measurements of atmospheric mole fractions
Benjamin Lebegue1, Martina Schmidt2, Michel Ramonet1, Benoit Wastine1, Camille Yver Kwok1, Olivier Laurent1, Sauveur Belviso1, Ali Guemri1, Carole Philippon1, Jeremiah Smith3, and Sebastien Conil4 1Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, LSCE/IPSL, CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
2Institut für Umweltphysik, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
3Thünen Institut für Agrarklimaschutz, Braunschweig, Germany
4Observatoire Pérenne de l'Environnement, ANDRA, Bure, France
Abstract. Over the last few decades, in situ measurements of atmospheric N2O mole fractions have been performed using gas chromatographs (GCs) equipped with electron capture detectors. This technique, however, becomes very challenging when trying to detect the small variations of N2O as the detectors are highly nonlinear and the GCs at remote stations require a considerable amount of maintenance by qualified technicians to maintain good short-term and long-term repeatability. With new robust optical spectrometers now available for N2O measurements, we aim to identify a robust and stable analyzer that can be integrated into atmospheric monitoring networks, such as the Integrated Carbon Observation System (ICOS). In this study, we present the most complete comparison of N2O analyzers, with seven analyzers that were developed and commercialized by five different companies. Each instrument was characterized during a time period of approximately 8 weeks. The test protocols included the characterization of the short-term and long-term repeatability, drift, temperature dependence, linearity and sensitivity to water vapor. During the test period, ambient air measurements were compared under field conditions at the Gif-sur-Yvette station. All of the analyzers showed a standard deviation better than 0.1 ppb for the 10 min averages. Some analyzers would benefit from improvements in temperature stability to reduce the instrument drift, which could then help in reducing the frequency of calibrations. For most instruments, the water vapor correction algorithms applied by companies are not sufficient for high-precision atmospheric measurements, which results in the need to dry the ambient air prior to analysis.

Citation: Lebegue, B., Schmidt, M., Ramonet, M., Wastine, B., Yver Kwok, C., Laurent, O., Belviso, S., Guemri, A., Philippon, C., Smith, J., and Conil, S.: Comparison of nitrous oxide (N2O) analyzers for high-precision measurements of atmospheric mole fractions, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 9, 1221-1238, doi:10.5194/amt-9-1221-2016, 2016.
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Short summary
In this study, we tested seven N2O analyzers from five different companies and compared the results with established techniques. The test protocols included the characterization of the short-term and long-term repeatability, drift, temperature dependence, linearity and sensitivity to water vapor. All of the analyzers showed a standard deviation better than 0.1 ppb for the 10-min averages. Some analyzers would benefit from improvements in temperature stability and water vapour correction.
In this study, we tested seven N2O analyzers from five different companies and compared the...
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