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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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Atmos. Meas. Tech., 10, 2353-2359, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-10-2353-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
28 Jun 2017
Brown carbon absorption in the red and near-infrared spectral region
András Hoffer et al.
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Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version      Supplement - Supplement
 
RC1: 'Review of “Brown carbon absorption in the red and near infrared spectral region,” by Hoffer et al.', Anonymous Referee #2, 03 Feb 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
 
RC2: 'Comment of referee#1 on “Brown carbon absorption in the red and near infrared spectral region” by András Hoffer et al.', Anonymous Referee #1, 09 Feb 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
 
SC1: 'comment on Hoffer et al.', Rawad Saleh, 09 Feb 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
 
RC3: 'General Comments', Anonymous Referee #3, 15 Feb 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
 
AC1: 'answers to the reviewers comments', András Gelencsér, 04 Apr 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by András Gelencsér on behalf of the Authors (04 Apr 2017)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (11 Apr 2017) by Alexander Kokhanovsky  
AR by András Gelencsér on behalf of the Authors (15 May 2017)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (16 May 2017) by Alexander Kokhanovsky
CC BY 4.0
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Black carbon (BC) aerosols have been conventionally assumed to be the only light-absorbing carbonaceous particles that absorb visible light in the atmosphere. Here we report that, contrary to the conventional belief, tar balls (a specific type of organic aerosol particles from biomass burning) do absorb visible light more than previously thought. Our results support previous findings that tar balls play an important role in global warming.
Black carbon (BC) aerosols have been conventionally assumed to be the only light-absorbing...
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