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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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Atmos. Meas. Tech., 10, 3539-3545, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-10-3539-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
27 Sep 2017
Ozone comparison between Pandora #34, Dobson #061, OMI, and OMPS in Boulder, Colorado, for the period December 2013–December 2016
Jay Herman1, Robert Evans2,*, Alexander Cede3, Nader Abuhassan1, Irina Petropavlovskikh4,5, Glenn McConville4,5, Koji Miyagawaa, and Brandon Noirot4,5 1University of Maryland Baltimore County (JCET) at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA
2NOAA/ESRL/GMD, Boulder, CO, USA
3LuftBlick, Austria and Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA
4NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, CO, USA
5Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA
avisiting scientist at: at NOAA/ESRL/GMD, Boulder, CO, USA
*retired
Abstract. A one-time-calibrated (in December 2013) Pandora spectrometer instrument (Pan #034) has been compared to a periodically calibrated Dobson spectroradiometer (Dobson #061) co-located in Boulder, Colorado, and compared with two satellite instruments over a 3-year period (December 2013–December 2016). The results show good agreement between Pan #034 and Dobson #061 within their statistical uncertainties. Both records are corrected for ozone retrieval sensitivity to stratospheric temperature variability obtained from the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) and Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-2) model calculations. Pandora #034 and Dobson #061 differ by an average of 2.1 ± 3.2 % when both instruments use their standard ozone absorption cross sections in the retrieval algorithms. The results show a relative drift (0.2 ± 0.08 % yr−1) between Pandora observations against NOAA Dobson in Boulder, CO, over a 3-year period of continuous operation. Pandora drifts relative to the satellite Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS) are +0.18 ± 0.2 % yr−1 and −0.18 ± 0.2 % yr−1, respectively, where the uncertainties are 2 standard deviations. The drift between Dobson #061 and OMPS for a 5.5-year period (January 2012–June 2017) is −0.07 ± 0.06 % yr−1.

Citation: Herman, J., Evans, R., Cede, A., Abuhassan, N., Petropavlovskikh, I., McConville, G., Miyagawa, K., and Noirot, B.: Ozone comparison between Pandora #34, Dobson #061, OMI, and OMPS in Boulder, Colorado, for the period December 2013–December 2016, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 10, 3539-3545, https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-10-3539-2017, 2017.
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Short summary
A co-located Pandora Spectrometer Instrument (Pan #034) has been compared to a well-calibrated Dobson spectroradiometer (Dobson #061) in Boulder, Colorado, and with two satellite instruments over a 3-year period. The results show good agreement between Pa n#034 and Dobson #061 and with the satellite data within their statistical uncertainties.
A co-located Pandora Spectrometer Instrument (Pan #034) has been compared to a well-calibrated...
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