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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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AMT | Articles | Volume 11, issue 1
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 11, 127–140, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-127-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 11, 127–140, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-127-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 10 Jan 2018

Research article | 10 Jan 2018

Measurement of atmospheric CO2 column concentrations to cloud tops with a pulsed multi-wavelength airborne lidar

Jianping Mao et al.
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Short summary
Precise global measurement of CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere is needed to understand carbon–climate feedbacks. Ideally we would measure from space 24/7 over all land and sea surfaces, in all-sky conditions, clouds, haze or dust and achieve near 100 % usable data. NASA-GSFC has developed a laser instrument to measure CO2 from an aircraft flying at over 40 000 feet as a satellite precursor. Here we demonstrate this measurement capability, highlighting data in the presence of a variety of clouds.
Precise global measurement of CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere is needed to understand...
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