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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 11, issue 4
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 11, 1901–1920, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-1901-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 11, 1901–1920, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-1901-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 05 Apr 2018

Research article | 05 Apr 2018

Measurement of formic acid, acetic acid and hydroxyacetaldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, and methyl peroxide in air by chemical ionization mass spectrometry: airborne method development

Victoria Treadaway et al.
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Cited articles  
Akagi, S. K., Yokelson, R. J., Wiedinmyer, C., Alvarado, M. J., Reid, J. S., Karl, T., Crounse, J. D., and Wennberg, P. O.: Emission factors for open and domestic biomass burning for use in atmospheric models, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 4039–4072, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-11-4039-2011, 2011.
Amelynck, C., Schoon, N., and Arijs, E.: Gas phase reactions of CF3O- and CF3O-H2O with nitric, formic, and acetic acid, Int. J. Mass Spectrom., 203, 165–175, https://doi.org/10.1016/S1387-3806(00)00321-3, 2000.
Baasandorj, M., Millet, D. B., Hu, L., Mitroo, D., and Williams, B. J.: Measuring acetic and formic acid by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry: sensitivity, humidity dependence, and quantifying interferences, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 8, 1303–1321, https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-8-1303-2015, 2015.
Bacher, C., Tyndall, G. S., and Orlando, J. J.: The atmospheric chemistry of glycoaldehyde, J. Atmos. Chem., 39, 171–189, 2001.
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A multi-reagent ion chemical ionization mass spectrometer was developed to quantify formic acid, acetic acid and hydroxyacetaldehyde (referred to as acetic acid equivalent sum, AAES), hydrogen peroxide and methyl peroxide. This set-up was successfully deployed in the field during the 2014 Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Exp. Laboratory and field work allowed the post-mission quantification of both formic acid and AAES sum during the 2012 Deep Convective Clouds and Chem. Exp.
A multi-reagent ion chemical ionization mass spectrometer was developed to quantify formic acid,...
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