Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.248 IF 3.248
  • IF 5-year value: 3.650 IF 5-year 3.650
  • CiteScore value: 3.37 CiteScore 3.37
  • SNIP value: 1.253 SNIP 1.253
  • SJR value: 1.869 SJR 1.869
  • IPP value: 3.29 IPP 3.29
  • h5-index value: 47 h5-index 47
  • Scimago H index value: 60 Scimago H index 60
Volume 11, issue 6 | Copyright
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 11, 3221-3249, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-11-3221-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 06 Jun 2018

Research article | 06 Jun 2018

Design, construction and commissioning of the Braunschweig Icing Wind Tunnel

Stephan E. Bansmer1, Arne Baumert1, Stephan Sattler1, Inken Knop1, Delphine Leroy2, Alfons Schwarzenboeck2, Tina Jurkat-Witschas3, Christiane Voigt3,4, Hugo Pervier5, and Biagio Esposito6 Stephan E. Bansmer et al.
  • 1Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Technische Universität Braunschweig, 38108 Braunschweig, Germany
  • 2Laboratoire de Météorologie Physique (LaMP), 63178 Aubiere CEDEX, France
  • 3Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut für Physik der Atmosphäre, Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany
  • 4Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, 55099 Mainz, Germany
  • 5School of Aerospace, Transport and Manufacturing, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Beds MK43 0AL, UK
  • 6Italian Aerospace Research Center (CIRA), Via Maiorise, 81043 Capua, Italy

Abstract. Beyond its physical importance in both fundamental and climate research, atmospheric icing is considered as a severe operational condition in many engineering applications like aviation, electrical power transmission and wind-energy production. To reproduce such icing conditions in a laboratory environment, icing wind tunnels are frequently used. In this paper, a comprehensive overview on the design, construction and commissioning of the Braunschweig Icing Wind Tunnel is given. The tunnel features a test section of 0.5m × 0.5m with peak velocities of up to 40ms−1. The static air temperature ranges from −25 to +30°C. Supercooled droplet icing with liquid water contents up to 3gm−3 can be reproduced. The unique aspect of this facility is the combination of an icing tunnel with a cloud chamber system for making ice particles. These ice particles are more realistic in shape and density than those usually used for mixed phase and ice crystal icing experiments. Ice water contents up to 20gm−3 can be generated. We further show how current state-of-the-art measurement techniques for particle sizing are performed on ice particles. The data are compared to those of in-flight measurements in mesoscale convective cloud systems in tropical regions. Finally, some applications of the icing wind tunnel are presented.

Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Snow, frost formation and ice cubes in our drinks are part of our daily life. But what about our technical innovations like aviation, electrical power transmission and wind-energy production, can they cope with icing? Icing Wind Tunnels are an ideal laboratory environment to answer that question. In this paper, we show how the icing wind tunnel in Braunschweig (Germany) was built and how we can use it for engineering and climate research.
Snow, frost formation and ice cubes in our drinks are part of our daily life. But what about our...
Citation
Share