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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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AMT | Articles | Volume 12, issue 7
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 12, 3853–3883, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-12-3853-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 12, 3853–3883, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-12-3853-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 15 Jul 2019

Research article | 15 Jul 2019

An adaptation of the CO2 slicing technique for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer to obtain the height of tropospheric volcanic ash clouds

Isabelle A. Taylor et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Isabelle Taylor on behalf of the Authors (10 May 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (20 May 2019) by Alexander Kokhanovsky
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Volcanic ash is a hazard associated with volcanoes. Knowing an ash cloud’s location is essential for minimising the hazard. This includes knowing the height. This study adapted a well-known technique for obtaining the height of meteorological clouds, known as CO2 slicing, for volcanic ash. Modelled data were used to refine the method and then demonstrate that the technique could work for volcanic ash. It was then successfully applied to data from the Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvötn eruptions.
Volcanic ash is a hazard associated with volcanoes. Knowing an ash cloud’s location is...
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