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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 5, issue 11 | Copyright

Special issue: Changes in the vertical distribution of ozone – the SI2N...

Atmos. Meas. Tech., 5, 2951-2967, 2012
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-5-2951-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 29 Nov 2012

Research article | 29 Nov 2012

Calibration of the SBUV version 8.6 ozone data product

M. T. DeLand, S. L. Taylor, L. K. Huang, and B. L. Fisher M. T. DeLand et al.
  • Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), 10210 Greenbelt Road, Suite 600, Lanham, Maryland 20706, USA

Abstract. This paper describes the calibration process for the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) Version 8.6 (V8.6) ozone data product. Eight SBUV instruments have flown on NASA and NOAA satellites since 1970, and a continuous data record is available since November 1978. The accuracy of ozone trends determined from these data depends on the calibration and long-term characterization of each instrument. V8.6 calibration adjustments are determined at the radiance level, and do not rely on comparison of retrieved ozone products with other instruments. The primary SBUV instrument characterization is based on prelaunch laboratory tests and dedicated on-orbit calibration measurements. We supplement these results with "soft" calibration techniques using carefully chosen subsets of radiance data and information from the retrieval algorithm output to validate each instrument's calibration. The estimated long-term uncertainty in albedo is approximately ±0.8–1.2% (1σ) for most of the instruments. The overlap between these instruments and the Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV) data allows us to intercalibrate the SBUV instruments to produce a coherent V8.6 data set covering more than 32 yr. The estimated long-term uncertainty in albedo is less than 3% over this period.

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