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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 9, issue 10
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 9, 4879–4890, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-9-4879-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Meas. Tech., 9, 4879–4890, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-9-4879-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 04 Oct 2016

Research article | 04 Oct 2016

Estimation of background gas concentration from differential absorption lidar measurements

Peter Harris, Nadia Smith, Valerie Livina, Tom Gardiner, Rod Robinson, and Fabrizio Innocenti Peter Harris et al.
  • National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW, UK

Abstract. Approaches are considered to estimate the background concentration level of a target species in the atmosphere from an analysis of the measured data provided by the National Physical Laboratory's differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system. The estimation of the background concentration level is necessary for an accurate quantification of the concentration level of the target species within a plume, which is the quantity of interest. The focus of the paper is on methodologies for estimating the background concentration level and, in particular, contrasting the assumptions about the functional and statistical models that underpin those methodologies. An approach is described to characterise the noise in the recorded signals, which is necessary for a reliable estimate of the background concentration level. Results for measured data provided by a field measurement are presented, and ideas for future work are discussed.

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We have described an approach to estimating the background concentration level of a species, such as methane, in the atmosphere from an analysis of the measured data provided by the National Physical Laboratory's differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system. The estimation of the background level supports the mapping of pollutant concentrations and the determination of emission fluxes. Results for data provided by a field measurement are presented, and ideas for future work are discussed.
We have described an approach to estimating the background concentration level of a species,...
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